How long does immigrant visa processing take?

How long does immigrant visa processing take? Generally speaking, a fair timeframe is approximately 6-10 months from the filing of the immigrant petition to approval at the U.S. Consulate. Timeframes can vary depending on backlogs of cases at both the USCIS and the U.S. Consulate abroad.

What is immigrant visa process? To apply for an immigrant visa, a foreign citizen seeking to immigrate generally must be sponsored by a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident immediate relative(s), or prospective U.S. employer, and have an approved petition before applying for an immigrant visa.

How long does it take to process an immigrant? Total time to naturalize: 18.5 months to 24 months

This is because some U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) field offices handle applications much faster than others (see “Understanding USCIS Processing Times” below).

How long does it take for an immigrant petition to be approved? After filing Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, the approval process can take anywhere from 5 to 12 months for immediate relatives and could take several years for family preference categories. This is an approximation. It may be shorter for some and longer for others.

Is NVC scheduling interviews 2022?

While in May 2022, NVC reported 421,136 eligible immigrant visa applicants still pending the scheduling of an interview after May 2022 appointment scheduling was completed, resulting in a growing backlog of 5,350 immigrant visa cases in June.

How long does it take NVC to schedule interview 2022?

How long does it take to get an appointment? Although NVC strives to schedule appointments within three months of NVC’s acceptance of all requested documentation, this timeframe is subject to the operating status and capacity of the consular section.

How Long Does It Take I-130 to be approved 2022?

Average time – Between five and 14.5 months to get a Form I-130 petition (Petition for Alien Relative) approved by USCIS as of early 2022; another six to 11 months or longer to get an immigrant visa to come to the United States.

How long does it take for I-130 to be approved 2021?

How long does the I-130 petition process take? For immediate relatives (spouse, unmarried child under 21 or parent) of a U.S. citizen living abroad, the wait times for Form I-130 are currently between 7.5-13.5 months.

Why is USCIS taking so long to process 2022?

The reasons for these delays are twofold: (1) the COVID19 pandemic impacted the efficiency and productivity of USCIS and all government functions, including mail delivery, and (2) the Trump Administration delayed processing of visa petitions as a way to reduce the number of legal immigrants entering the United States.

How long does it take after I-130 is approved?

That can often take six to eight weeks after approval of the I-130, and possibly even longer. When NVC receives your case, it will send you a notification, typically via email. If you’re a “preference relative” (on a waiting list), that delay won’t affect you much.

How long does it take for NVC to send case to Embassy 2022?

Your petition is awaiting an interview appointment. At this time, no further action is required. We appreciate your patience. After the NVC sends you this confirmation, then you can expect to wait between 2-6 months for the NVC to schedule you an interview at the U.S. consulate in your home country.

Can I travel after I-130 is approved?

However, if your I-130 petition is approved and you have filed for adjustment of status or you concurrently filed I-130 and I-485 and they are in pending status then traveling outside the U.S. will result in abandoning your application.

What happens after my immigrant visa is approved?

Once you have received your immigrant visa, you must enter the United States within the visa validity period to obtain an alien registration receipt or “green” card (Form I-151 or I-551) that will allow you to live and work in the United States. You will receive your passport from the courier service.

How long does immigrant visa interview take?

How long should I allow for my immigrant visa interview? You should expect to be at the Embassy 2- 3 hours.

How long does it take to get green card after immigrant visa?

It may take up to 90 days from the date you entered to receive your permanent resident card. You entered the U.S. using your immigrant visa, You paid the immigrant visa fee AFTER you entered, It may take up to 90 days from the date you made your payment to receive your permanent resident card.

How long does it take to get immigrant visa after interview?

Visa Processing Time

Provided the visa is approved at the time of the visa interview, most applicants receive their visas in about 10 days from their interviews.

How long does it take USCIS to make a decision after interview 2022?

Technically, the USCIS has to provide you with a decision on your naturalization application within 120 days of your naturalization interview. In a green card application, the USCIS is supposed to provide you with an official notification of their decision within 30 days of your interview.

How do you know if U.S. visa is approved after interview?

At the end of your immigrant visa interview at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate, the consular officer will inform you whether your visa application is approved or denied. Visa approval – When approved, you will be informed how and when your passport and visa will be returned to you.

What questions do they ask at immigrant visa interview?

Officers can ask a vast range of questions, but here are some examples:
  • How, where, and when did you meet your spouse?
  • Where did your first date take place?
  • How long did were you with your spouse before getting married?
  • When and where were you married?
  • Did you go on a honeymoon?
  • What is your spouse’s current job?

What should you not say in an immigration interview?

Can an immigrant visa be denied?

Among the reasons the U.S. government might deny an immigrant visa or green card are its own error (or yours, in completing the paperwork), concern that you are a security risk, inadmissibility for health or criminal reasons, a finding that you are likely to become reliant on government assistance, and more.